• Watching the sunrise near Angkor Wat was a truly calming and mesmerizing meditative experience.
Date
July 22, 2014
Local Time
12:37 pm

Perhaps it’s not surprising that Kyoto and Siem Reap both resonate with me so deeply—both are ancient capital cities lush with natural beauty and countless temples. Another similarity is the hospitality one feels during every interaction, no matter how small—from a smile on the street to incredibly accommodating rickshaw drivers who seem to transport you in time as well across town.

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Date
July 17, 2014
Local Time
03:20 pm

At TATCHA, we love bringing new life to old traditions, and while modernizing the geisha’s skincare rituals is our main focus, it’s far from our only twist on time. The building that houses our San Francisco headquarters was the site of a popular nightclub a few decades ago. Today, the interior white walls, skylights and exposed beams are familiar sights at many start-ups, but we kept the original disco ball hanging high in the rafters as a tribute to the sentiment and free-spirited passion it symbolizes.

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  • The Biwako canal at dusk is a breathtaking sight. Photo by Jeffrey Friedl.
Date
July 15, 2014
Local Time
02:44 pm

As summer comes upon us, travel is in the air. Whether enjoying a short trip down the coast of California or a well-earned family vacation to Europe, it seems that many of my friends are embarking on their own journeys these warm months.

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  • Sweet sentiments from our Tatcha family decorate the Wishing Tree we set up in our San Francisco headquarters in honor of the Tanabata Festival.
Date
July 07, 2014
Local Time
10:57 am

During one of my summer visits to Kyoto, I was surprised by colorful, gorgeous decorations lining the streets and buildings. Bright streamers brushed the ground, while colored paper with delicate calligraphy fluttered on bamboo trees. Delicious smells emanated from food stalls and children played games in the street.

Delighted, I asked my traveling companion about the celebrations. She told me the story behind the Tanabata Festival, which has since become one of my favorite tales.

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  • Makeup artist Daniel Martin working his magic backstage at New York Fashion Week in September 2013.
Date
June 12, 2014
Local Time
03:39 pm

Tatcha is what it is today largely because of a handful of people who believed in us and shared our love for beauty born from time tested tradition.

Daniel Martin was one of these angels, a supporter who saw what we were trying to bring to the world, championing our cause from our earliest day and becoming a lifelong friend in the process.

As a celebrated editorial makeup artist, he is on speed-dial for the world’s top beauty editors, dressing the faces that grace magazine covers every day, creating the looks on the world's top runways and inspiring many of his friends and colleagues (myself included) daily.

He is, in fact, the inspiration for one of the newest additions to our collection: the Luminous Deep Hydration Firming Serum. Daniel reached out to tell me that he loves the firming, plumping qualities of our Luminous Deep Hydration Lifting Mask, but there were times when he didn't have 15 minutes to prep the skin before applying makeup on his famous faces. Instead, he asked, could we somehow bottle it? And that was when the Luminous lightbulb went on.

I am honored to call Daniel a friend, and delighted to share some of his beauty secrets.

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  • Tatcha Eye Mask Pattern Honors the Magatama Shape
Date
June 11, 2014
Local Time
03:05 pm

I don’t wear much jewelry, but the few pieces I do wear are very meaningful to me. I always wear my wedding band, of course, and a simple coin necklace given to me by one of my dearest friends.

When we created our Luminous Deep Hydration Revitalizing Eye Mask, we shaped the eye mask after magatama, a traditional and beloved Japanese symbol and accessory. The comma-shaped beads first appeared in prehistoric Japan, originally shaped from earthen materials but eventually crafted from jade and other precious stones. Our natural eye mask continued with this tradition and the eye mask pattern reflects that of magatama. In addition to serving as jewelry, they were used as ceremonial objects. Along with a sword (representing valor) and a mirror (representing wisdom), the magatama is one of the sacred treasures of the Imperial family, representing benevolence.

The shape of the magatama, and our japanese eye mask, is far from accidental. It derives from the yin-yang symbol, created in ancient times by recording the shadows cast by the sun in concentric circles on the ground. The markings resulted in the classic form that is so widely recognized today, signifying the harmony of the sun and the moon, and the belief among many that it bestows the wearer with protection, longevity and prosperity.

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  • Tatcha Designer Stanley Hainsworth Stanley Hainsworth on a recent trip to Kyoto, wearing a hat by Hirose-San, which is covered with kimono silk. Photo by Thor Swift.
Date
June 09, 2014
Local Time
04:18 pm

A new company is like a child, in that it takes a village to truly shape what it becomes. One person who has been uniquely instrumental in creating the brand that you know today is my cofounder Stanley Hainsworth. Stanley and I have been friends for years and call one another “Twin”—a joke because of our opposite styles. His is colorful, outgoing and fearless, compared to my more reserved personality and all-black wardrobe. I veer towards logistics and deliberation, while he is a true artist and a world-class designer.

It was important to me to have Stanley involved from the very beginning. Design is an integral part of our brand, honoring our heritage and paying homage to the beautiful aesthetics of Japan and the geisha.

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  • A page detail from a book of Japanese family crests dating from the 9th century and used by kimono merchants, who embroidered the designs onto their clients' garments.
Date
June 09, 2014
Local Time
02:53 pm

Though our TATCHA team has grown quite a bit, our shared dedication to bringing the secrets of the past to life has created a deep bond—we truly consider ourselves a family. In Japan, as in other parts of the world, many families have a crest, called a mon, used to decorate everything from formal kimono and swords to vanity sets to banners outside the home.

These symbols, used as historical representations of a family’s lineage, were first used in the 9th century by nobility and later extended to the wider population. Just like monograms and coats of arms, these motifs communicated more than a name alone could convey.

So it was only natural that as we were creating TATCHA, we wanted a mon of our own. Nami Onodera, our Director of Product Marketing and cultural advisor, found a stunning book containing over 20,000 family crests and their meanings. I loved the detail that each entailed: A fan, for example, represented a family of dancers; a chrysanthemum symbolizes loyalty.

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Date
June 06, 2014
Local Time
10:40 am

When I travel to Japan, I find inspiration everywhere I turn. As many of you know, the skincare rituals of the geisha inspired me to create TATCHA, formulating the collection after their recipes, honed by generations. Japanese culture is steeped in centuries of tradition and symbolism, a heritage I sought to honor in designing the collection. Designer extraordinare and TATCHA co-founder Stanley Hainsworth helped breathe modern life into these traditions, and I am excited to share with you some of the meaning behind our packaging.

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