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Inc.-REDIBLE

Sometimes, in the midst of the daily whirlwind, there comes a moment when time stands still as a thought or feeling crystallizes in a new way. Last week I had one of those moments when the new issue of Inc. magazine landed on my desk, declaring Tatcha the 21st-fastest growing private company in the country over the past three years. 

 

“We’re grateful each and every day for the fans and friends who believed in us from the beginning ...”
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A Brush with SPF

Meeting a living, breathing geisha for the first time is a bit like looking at someone who just stepped out of a museum painting. The elaborate kimono and perfect hair capture the eye first, but it’s the iconic white makeup that mesmerizes me the most.

“Oshiroi is comprised mostly of natural ingredients, including titanium dioxide and zinc oxide ...”
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Practically Perfect In Every Way

There is perhaps no image from Kyoto more iconic than a geisha making her way along cobblestone streets beneath a colorful parasol. Boldly hued or delicately decorated, the design has remained virtually unchanged for centuries—a combination of bamboo, washi paper and tightly woven thread that artisans hand craft into surprisingly durable, lightweight treasures.

“To this day, I always smile when I see a parasol ...”
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Night Lights of Summer

Summers in Japan are filled with festivals and celebrations for everything from fans to flowers, but today marks the last day of Obon, one of the most special.

“Decorated with messages of goodwill, the lanterns bob on the river’s gentle current...”
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A Super Supper

Some people handle scorching summer weather well. And then there’s me. When the mercury hits more than 85 degrees, I feel like a flower wilting in windowsill. In Kyoto, the humidity seems to intensify the effect, but it is there that I discovered one of my favorite tricks for staying cool: Eating soba noodles.

“...despite its name, [buckwheat] is not a member of the wheat family—it’s actually a fiber­-rich fruit seed.”
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