I don’t wear much jewelry, but the few pieces I do wear are very meaningful to me. I always wear my wedding band, of course, and a simple coin necklace given to me by one of my dearest friends.

When we created our Luminous Deep Hydration Revitalizing Eye Mask, we shaped the eye mask after magatama, a traditional and beloved Japanese symbol and accessory. The comma-shaped beads first appeared in prehistoric Japan, originally shaped from earthen materials but eventually crafted from jade and other precious stones. Our natural eye mask continued with this tradition and the eye mask pattern reflects that of magatama. In addition to serving as jewelry, they were used as ceremonial objects. Along with a sword (representing valor) and a mirror (representing wisdom), the magatama is one of the sacred treasures of the Imperial family, representing benevolence.

The shape of the magatama, and our eye mask, is far from accidental. It derives from the yin-yang symbol, created in ancient times by recording the shadows cast by the sun in concentric circles on the ground. The markings resulted in the classic form that is so widely recognized today, signifying the harmony of the sun and the moon, and the belief among many that it bestows the wearer with protection, longevity and prosperity.

I was awed to hear about the deep symbolism behind this innocuous shape—especially because when utilized as an eye mask pattern, it also was the most effective shape for targeting the area around the eyes for treatment. During testing, I realized magatama had the additional benefit of being uniquely versatile, fitting equally well on men and women, those with various eye shapes and face sizes. It seemed like a sign from above that we were on the right track. I love that this shape gives our simple eye mask much more meaning. And I hope that, as we approach the Vernal Equinox, the magatama brings you the fortune of the sun and moon combined.

Always, 

Vicky

Learn more about our LUMINOUS Deep Hydration Revitalizing Lifting Mask here.

Victoria Tsai
Chief Treasure Hunter

published June 2014

Design
share this post
back to t house